Program for Hamlet

hamlet
From left to right: Christine Lamborn as Gertrude, Anna Hamaguchi as Claudius, Jaime Bradner as Hamlet

HAMLET

Touring to Schools April 4 – May 4

Free Public Performance at the Hawaii State Library on Thursday April 21 at 6:30pm

Directed by R. Kevin Garcia Doyle, assisted by Amanda Stone


DIRECTOR’S NOTE  

I have been closely involved with three and a half productions of Hamlet.  In addition to this current production,  I stage managed a production in the 80’s, directed one for the first season of the Hawaii Shakespeare Festival and played Hamlet in director Paul Mitri’s version of The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged).  Every time I work on it, I say the same thing: “Now, finally, I understand Hamlet.”

One of the things that has allowed Shakespeare’s work to thrive for 400 years is that he addresses many universal themes, characters and situations in his plays.  This is very true in regards to Hamlet.  For example, the title character is reeling from the death of his father and is having a hard time moving on with his life.  Furthermore, Hamlet has a new step-father whom he despises.  The prince struggles with mortality – he wonders if life is worth living and worries about what might happen after death.  He breaks up with his girlfriend, Ophelia.  His girlfriend’s dad (Polonius) and brother (Laertes) don’t seem to like him very much.  He fights with his mom.  He has a best friend (Horatio) with whom he can share his secrets.  These are all things that still feel fresh today because they’re all things that humans still experience today.  

Oh, and there’s a ghost and a bunch of murders too.

Following a long tradition of actresses playing Hamlet (starting perhaps with Sarah Bernhardt in the 19th century), we’ve chosen to have an all-female cast play our show.  During Shakespeare’s time, of course, his shows were played with all-male casts.  Amanda and I believe that having an all female cast also highlights how men were allowed to behave in Shakespeare’s time but are, perhaps, discouraged from behaving now.  We encourage you to consider this as you discuss the play.

Thank you so much for watching our show.  We hope you enjoy it!

–R. Kevin Garcia Doyle, April 2016

R. KEVIN GARCIA DOYLE is a founding member of the Hawaii Shakespeare Festival.  For the Festival, he’s directed Hamlet, Henry IV Part 1, All’s Well That Ends Well, The Winter’s Tale, Much Ado About Nothing, Pericles, The TempestTroilus and Cressida, Othello, and Oliver Goldsmith’s She Stoops To Conquer.  He’s also directed Measure for Measure, Macbeth and The Comedy of Errors.  Doyle also has directed locally at UH Manoa, Kumu Kahua Theater, All The World’s A Stage Theater Co., and at Manoa Valley Theater.  Doyle is also heavily involved in the improvisational theater scene in Hawaii, particularly with On The Spot.


THE CAST 

Jaime Bradner:  Hamlet

jaime

JAIME BRADNER is extremely thrilled to be a part this spring’s touring cast of Hamlet.   Previous to playing the brooding Prince of Denmark, she appeared in several productions for the Hawaii Shakespeare Festival, most notably as Desdemona/Shadow Desdemona in Othello (2015).  She has studied theatre and voice at Leeward Community College, and the University of Hawaii at Manoa and has performed in numerous productions at Kumu Kahua Theatre, Leeward Theatre and Mark’s Garage.  She is currently studying to be a therapist, and hopes to incorporate her passion for theatre as a healing technique for others.  She would like to thank her family and friends for their love and support, as well as R. Kevin Garcia Doyle and Amanda Stone for this amazing opportunity.

Anna Hamaguchi:  Ghost, Claudius, Ophelia, Player King, Gravedigger, Osric

anna ANNA HAMAGUCHI is currently working toward her MFA in acting from UH Manoa and holds a BA in Cinematic Arts from the University of Southern California.  In Los Angeles, she appeared in numerous independent films such as Clear Lake, WI, Philipe’s Sandwich and Jonathan, for which she won Best Actress at the Pan Pacific Film Festival.  She also produced and performed in original works with a theatre company she co-founded, Streetlamp Studio.  Most recently she performed with the New Haven Theatre Company, Clockwork Repertory Theatre and Playhouse on Park in Connecticut.  She also appeared in Episode 5 of “Hawaii 5-0” this past season.  She is excited to be in her first Hawaii Shakespeare Festival production!

Christine Lamborn:  Horatio, Gertrude, Laertes, Polonius, Player Queen

christineCHRISTINE LAMBORN has earned her Bachelors of Fine Arts Degree from Belmont University where she studied Theater with an emphasis in Performance.  She is elated to be working with director R. Kevin Doyle and the Hawaii Shakespeare Festival again.  She has appeared in several productions for the Hawaii Shakespeare Festival, most recently as Desdemona and Shadow Desdemona in last year’s production of Othello; and as Sempronious in HSF’s past summer production of Timon of Athens.  She has performed at a number of other local theatres, including Kumu Kahua Theatre, Manoa Valley Theatre, and Leeward Theatre.  She has also been involved with several local TV and radio commercials, independent film productions, and performed with various Improv Theater Companies.  You can find out more about her past acting experience and upcoming roles by going to her website: cslamborn.wix.com/actor.


PRODUCTION CREW

Director:  R. Kevin Garcia Doyle

Assistant Director and Lead Script Editor:  Amanda Stone

Costume Designer:  Carlynn Wolfe

Set Designer:  R. Andrew Doan

Fight Choreography:  Tony Pisculli

Tour Coordinator:  Lacey Chu


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Many thanks to Mid-Pacific Institute and Sharon Racho Garcia Doyle.

Hamlet School Tour

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Illustration by John Austen, from the Folger Shakespeare Library

Hamlet

April 4 – May 4

Directed by R. Kevin Garcia Doyle

Assistant Director:  Amanda Stone

Something is rotten in Denmark!  The ghost of Hamlet’s dead father has returned to ask his son to seek revenge against the man who murdered him – Hamlet’s uncle, King Claudius.  Hamlet pretends to be insane so he can uncover the truth in secret.  As his murderous uncle begins to suspect that Hamlet knows his bloody secret and the body count rises, Hamlet must decide if he’ll exact his revenge or not.

To commemorate the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death on April 23rd 2016, the Hawaii Shakespeare Festival will be touring a production of Hamlet to schools throughout April.  This unique, 1-hour production will feature an all-female cast of three actors playing multiple roles.

HSF’s production of Hamlet follows a long tradition – both locally and internationally – of women playing all the roles in the play.  A cast of three actresses seamlessly transform into each of Hamlet‘s iconic characters.  The character of Horatio, Hamlet’s friend and confidante, serves as a kind of narrator to help the audience follow the transformations and scenes.

The HSF Touring School Show project was founded to bring Shakespeare’s characters and stories alive for students studying his plays, and to provide them with the excitement and immediacy of the live theatre experience.  Hamlet marks the program’s fourth educational tour, following successful productions of Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, which toured to thirty different local schools over the past two years.

The Cast

Jaime Bradner:  Hamlet

Anna Hamaguchi:  Claudius, Ophelia, Ghost, Gravedigger, and others

Christine Lamborn:  Gertrude, Horatio, Laertes, Polonius, and others

Performances

School performances will take place Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from April 4 – May 4, during school hours.

The production is designed to be as flexible as possible to suit a variety of indoor venues, and can be performed for a single classroom, or for much larger groups of students.  Past performances have taken place in auditoriums, theatres, halls, cafeterias, gyms, chapels, and classrooms.  Note that the actors perform unamplified, so smaller indoor venues with good acoustics provide the best experience for our student audiences.

Pricing

The cost of a single performance of Hamlet is $250.  For multiple performances at the same school, the price is $200 per show.

Contact

For more information, or to inquire about scheduling a performance, please contact HSF’s Education Director, Lacey, at laceyperrine@gmail.com.

A Midsummer Night’s Gleam

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We had the chance to perform our touring version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream one last time on July 18th, for Foster Botanical Garden’s annual event, A Midsummer Night’s Gleam.  Audience members gathered on the lawn around the outdoor stage, while the sun slowly set and the moon began to rise during the show–providing a magical backdrop for the play!

Many thanks to Iris and the other staff members at Foster Gardens, and also Mike from the Air Force Band, for helping to make the performance possible!

Helena and Hermia
Helena and Hermia

Feedback from A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Performing the show at Maryknoll School.  Photos courtesy of Diana Wan.
Performing the show at Maryknoll School. Photos courtesy of Diana Wan.

Many thanks to all those who helped contribute to the success of our tour of A Midsummer Night’s Dream!  We performed the last school show yesterday afternoon, to a very enthusiastic audience of 7th graders at Moanalua Middle School–it was a fantastic end to a really wonderful tour!  The past four weeks, the show toured to 19 different schools on Oahu, performing to over 3,000 students in grades 4-12.


Here’s what some of the teachers had to say about the show:

–Lawrence Wayman, Farrington High School:

Please express my thanks to the cast for their magnificent performance gift this morning.  The students were with you from the beginning; they hung on every word and gesture.  Some students have never seen a live performance by professional actors of anything.  You were their first, and I think they are “hooked.”

–Elsa Britton, Waolani Judd Nazarene School:

Thank you so much for a fantastic performance of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”  I thoroughly enjoyed your interpretation of the play.  Please know that I found your troupe of actors to be phenomenal.  I hope you can tell by the audience’s response that everyone (both schools) found your play to be both entertaining and delightful.  I would love to book you guys for next year if you are doing more “Shakespeare in the Schools”.  Mahalo again for a superb job!

–Julia Wong, Windward Nazarene Academy:

The students of Windward Nazarene thoroughly enjoyed the traveling production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream performed this morning.  We would like to thank the cast and director for such a thrilling experience.

–Dr. Peter Webb, `Iolani School:

What a great performance!  Please pass on to the actors my compliments on their poise and polish.  They handled the restrictions of the space and acoustics with aplomb, and had the students alternately enthralled and laughing hysterically.  Great cutting on the script–I liked the idea of starting “in medias res” in the forest.  As always, the ‘Pyramus and Thisby’ play stole the show.  We’d love to have you back!

–Jennifer Stierli, Pacific Buddhist Academy:

Thank you for an awesome performance at Pacific Buddhist Academy today!  You won over a really tough crowd.  The students spent the rest of the afternoon reliving their favorite comedic moments.

–Roland Nipps, Mid-Pacific Institute:

Many thanks from my freshmen students.  They adored the play!  Please extend our thanks to the troupe.  They were wonderful.  It’s super to make Shakespeare ‘live.’  Can’t wait till next year’s performance.
–Diana Wan, Maryknoll School:
Thank you for a wonderful performance today at Maryknoll!  It’s always a pleasure to welcome you and the company to our campus.

And here are some comments from students:

–Mackenzie N., Grade 5, Windward Nazarene Academy:
You did a great job and were funny.  Great job on working super hard and performing a great show.  You did a good job and had a very positive and happy attitude while you performed.  Thanks again for putting on an awesome show.
–Andrew B., Grade 6, Windward Nazarene Academy:
I thought you guys were really good at acting.  I thought you guys were really funny.  You guys were funny, good, and convincing.  You guys did a great job with this play and I enjoyed it.

Program for A Midsummer Night’s Dream

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A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM

Touring to Schools April 6 – May 1

Public Performance at the Bishop Museum on Sat Apr 18 at 7:30pm

Directed by R. Kevin Garcia Doyle


DIRECTOR’S NOTE
A Midsummer Night’s Dream has proven to be one of William Shakespeare’s best loved and most enduring plays.  400 years before Stephen Sondheim penned Into The Woods, Shakespeare had already recognized the theatrical possibilities of sending different groups of characters into the forest where they face magic, mischief and merriment.  What’s more, the characters and situations Shakespeare created for this play still seem familiar to us today.

For example, the lovers – Helena, Hermia, Lysander, and Demetrius – with all their passions, misunderstandings and follies behave just like young couples today.  They argue, break up, make up and then argue some more just like all couples have. Titania and Oberon, like many couples who’ve been together for years, have started bickering about minor things.  Today, it is because Oberon wants Titania‘s young page to serve as his page, but tomorrow it might be about his bad breath or her choice of hat. The Athenian workers – called the Mechanicals – who put on the play are a wonderful mix of ego and naivety.  Bottom, for example, is full of bluster and ego while Flute is inexperienced and more than a little freaked out about his upcoming theatrical debut.  Everyone who has been on stage will recognize these community theater stereotypes! And as for Puck, who among us hasn’t met somebody who loves to play jokes on people?

We hope that you are able to see characters and situations that are familiar to you as you watch our play!   Enjoy the show!

–R. Kevin Garcia Doyle, April 2015

R. KEVIN GARCIA DOYLE is a founding member of the Hawaii Shakespeare Festival.  For the Festival, he’s directed Hamlet, Henry IV Part 1, All’s Well That Ends Well, The Winter’s Tale, Much Ado About Nothing, Pericles, The TempestTroilus and Cressida, and Oliver Goldsmith’s She Stoops To Conquer.  He’s also directed Measure for Measure, Macbeth and The Comedy of Errors.  Doyle also has directed locally at UH Manoa, Kumu Kahua Theater, All The World’s A Stage Theater Co., and at Manoa Valley Theater.  Doyle is also heavily involved in the improvisational theater scene in Hawaii, particularly with On The Spot.


THE CAST

Nicholas Atiburcio:  Bottom (Pyramus), Demetrius

NICHOLAS ATIBURCIO has a B.A. in Theatre from UH Manoa.  He has appeared in several productions for the Hawaii Shakespeare Festival, including Pericles, and most recently as one of the titular characters in The Two Noble Kinsmen.  He has also performed in various productions at UH Manoa, including Waiting for Godot, and a number of plays for young audiences.  He also performs stand-up comedy.

Lacey Perrine Chu:  Quince (Wall), Titania, Helena

lacey_chu_007r-3LACEY PERRINE CHU trained in classical acting at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School in England.  She also studied Shakespeare at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, and drama at the Cambridge School of Visual and Performing Arts in the UK.  She has appeared in many productions for the Hawaii Shakespeare Festival, most recently doubling as Juliet and Tybalt in last year’s school tour of Romeo and Juliet; and as Cressida in HSF’s summer production of Troilus and Cressida.  She has performed at a number of other local theatres, including TAG, Kumu Kahua Theatre, Diamond Head Theatre, and HPU Theatre.  She was also the creator of an original production of Strindberg’s Miss Julie, a project for which she wrote the adaptation, and acted in the title role (All the World’s a Stage Theatre Company).

Moses Goods:  Flute (Thisbe), Oberon, Lysander

headshot1MOSES GOODS began his acting career in the University of Hawaii’s Department of Theatre and Dance in 1999 and has since become a professional storyteller, writer and award winning actor.  Moses has done extensive work as a company actor with the renowned Honolulu Theatre for Youth.  Other professional theatre involvement include work with Ulalena, Waikiki Nei, Kahekili and the one-man-show The Legend of Kaululā‘au that toured to Edinburgh, Scotland.  Moses has also traveled to Germany, the continental United States, the Pacific Islands and Canada sharing the stories of Hawaii with a global audience.  This May, Moses will return to Washington D.C. once again as a featured storyteller at The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian.  Moses also dances hula with the award winning Halau Mohala ‘Ilima.

Kyle Scholl:  Snug (Lion), Puck, Hermia

kyleKYLE SCHOLL will be receiving her M.F.A. in Acting from UH Manoa in May.  She also holds a B.A. in Musical Theatre from Sam Houston State University.  Last summer, she appeared as the title character in the Hawaii Shakespeare Festival’s production of She Stoops to Conquer.  She has performed in numerous productions at UH, most notably as Katherine in The Taming of the Shrew, Elvira in Blythe Spirit, and Kate in The Wild Party.  She recently won first place in the National Society of Arts and Letters Hawaii Chapter drama competition, and will go on to compete in the NSAL National Competition next month.  She currently teaches Intermediate Voice for the Actor at UH Manoa.


PRODUCTION CREW

Photographer and Rehearsal Assistant:  Kierdre Howard

Fight Choreography:  Tony Pisculli

Costume Construction:  Wanda Chu

Costume and Prop Design:  Lacey Chu


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Many thanks to Ryan Sueoko, The Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Mike Smola at the Hawaiian Mission Houses, Gerry Kawaoka and Rick Greaver at UH Manoa’s Kennedy Theatre, Stephanie Keiko Kong, and Peggy Krock.

Photos from A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Photos from the play, taken during a dress rehearsal at the Hawaiian Hall Atrium of the Bishop Museum.

Quince:  Our play is The Most Lamentable Comedy, and Most Cruel Death of Pyramus and Thisbe!
Quince: Our play is The Most Lamentable Comedy, and Most Cruel Death of Pyramus and Thisbe!
Bottom:  'The raging rocks/ And shivering shocks/ Shall break the locks!'  This was lofty.
Bottom: ‘The raging rocks/ And shivering shocks/ Shall break the locks!’ This was lofty.
Bottom:  I will aggravate my voice so that I will roar you as gently as any sucking dove; I will roar you an 'twere any nightingale.
Bottom: I will aggravate my voice so that I will roar you as gently as any sucking dove; I will roar you an ’twere any nightingale.
Bottom:  Take pains; be perfect; adieu!
Bottom: Take pains; be perfect; adieu!
Oberon:  Why should Titania cross her Oberon?  I do but beg a little changeling boy to be my henchman.
Oberon: Why should Titania cross her Oberon? I do but beg a little changeling boy to be my henchman.
Oberon:  What thou seest when thou dost wake, /Do it for thy true-love take...
Oberon: What thou seest when thou dost wake, /Do it for thy true-love take…
Lysander:  One turf shall serve as pillow for us both; /One heart, one bed, two bosoms and one troth.
Lysander: One turf shall serve as pillow for us both; /One heart, one bed, two bosoms and one troth.
Snug:  O Bottom, thou art changed!  What do I see on thee?
Snug: O Bottom, thou art changed! What do I see on thee?
Bottom:  ...and yet, to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together now-a-days.
Bottom: …and yet, to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together now-a-days.
Puck:  My mistress with a monster is in love!
Puck: My mistress with a monster is in love!
Oberon:  Flower of this purple dye, /Hit with Cupid's archery, /Sink in apple of his eye...
Oberon: Flower of this purple dye, /Hit with Cupid’s archery, /Sink in apple of his eye…
Helena:  Let me go!  /You see how simple and how fond I am!
Helena: Let me go! /You see how simple and how fond I am!
Puck:  When thou wakest, /Thou takest /True delight /In the sight /Of thy former lady's eye.
Puck: When thou wakest, /Thou takest /True delight /In the sight /Of thy former lady’s eye.
Oberon:  Welcome, good Robin.  See'st thou this sweet sight?
Oberon: Welcome, good Robin. See’st thou this sweet sight?
Bottom:  Methought I was--and methought I had--but man is but a patched fool if he will offer to say what methought I had!
Bottom: Methought I was–and methought I had–but man is but a patched fool if he will offer to say what methought I had!
Pyramus:  O grim looked night!  O night with hue so black!
Pyramus: O grim looked night! O night with hue so black!
Thisbe and the Lion
Thisbe and the Lion

Vocabulary Words in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Oberon and Puck
Oberon and Puck. [Photo by Kierdre Howard]
There are a number of words and phrases in the play which may be unfamiliar to modern audiences.  Definitions of a selection of words are given below, taken from Shakespeare’s Words: A Glossary and Language Companion by David and Ben Crystal.

One advantage of watching (or listening to) a Shakespeare performance, is that you can usually understand what’s happening in the play though you may not know the meaning of every single word that’s spoken.  The actors use their voices and bodies to express their character’s lines; and Shakespeare’s frequent use of onomatopoeia often helps to illuminate obscure words.  For instance, you may not know the exact definition of the word ‘jangling,’ but the word itself sounds jarring, noisy, and lively.

Vocabulary Words (in the order in which they appear in the play)

Interlude:  Short play, theatrical performance [staged to fill an interval].  “Here is the scroll of every man’s name, which is thought fit, through all Athens, to play in our interlude before the duke and the duchess, on his wedding day at night.” –Quince, Act 1 Scene 2

Extempore:  Spontaneously, without preparation, improvised for the occasion.  “You may do it extempore, for it is nothing but roaring.” –Quince, Act 1 Scene 2

Con:  Learn by heart, commit to memory.  “But, masters, here are your parts: and I am to entreat you, request you, and desire you, to con them by tomorrow night…” –Quince, Act 1 Scene 2

Mead:  Meadow.  “And never, since the middle summer’s spring, /Met we on hill, in dale, forest or mead…” [also, a dale is a valley] –Titania, Act II Scene 1

Changeling:  A child taken by fairies.  “I do but beg a little changeling boy /To be my henchman.” –Oberon, Act II Scene 1

Adamant:  Legendary substance of great hardness and magnetism.  “You draw me, you hard-hearted adamant…” –Helena, Act II Scene 1

Brake:  Bush, thicket.  “I’ll run from thee, and hide me in the brakes…” –Demetrius, Act II Scene 1.      “When you have spoken your speech, enter into that brake…” –Quince, Act III Scene 1.      “[Pyramus] forsook his scene and entered in a brake…” –Puck, Act III Scene 2

Ounce:  Lynx.  Pard:      Panther, leopard.  “Be it ounce, or cat, or bear, /Pard or boar with bristled hair…” –Oberon, Act II Scene 2

Weeds:  Garments, clothing.  “Weeds of Athens he doth wear…” –Puck, Act II Scene 2

Churl:  Villain, contemptible fellow.  “Churl, upon thy eyes I throw /All the power this charm doth owe.” –Puck, Act II Scene 2

Darkling:  In the dark, in darkness.  “O, wilt thou darkling leave me? do not so.” –Helena, Act II Scene 2

Pat:  On the dot, exactly.  “[Bottom:Are we all met?   [Quince:Pat, pat; and here’s a marvelous convenient place for our rehearsal.” –Quince, Act III Scene 1

Almanac:  Calendar.  [Also gives information on weather, and the rising and setting of the moon and sun].  “Look in the almanac; find out moonshine, find out moonshine.” –Bottom, Act III Scene 1

Casement:  Moveable section of a window.  “Why, then may you leave a casement of the great  chamber window, where we play, open, and the moon may shine in at the casement.” –Bottom, Act III Scene 1

Ousel:  Blackbird.  “The ousel cock so black of hue, /With orange-tawny bill…” –Bottom, Act III Scene 1

Throstle:  Thrush.  “The throstle with his note so true…” –Bottom, Act III Scene 1

Gleek:  Make a pointed joke, jest, gibe.  “Nay, I can gleek upon occasion.” –Bottom, Act III Scene 1

Patches:  Fools, clowns.      Rude:  Ignorant, unlearned, uneducated.      Mechanical:  Manual worker, craftsman.  “A crew of patches, rude mechanicals, /That work for bread upon Athenian stalls…” –Puck, Act III Scene 2

Nole:  Head.  “An ass’s nole I fixed on his head.” –Puck, Act III Scene 2

Aby.  Suffer for, pay for, atone for.  “Disparage not the faith thou dost not know, /Lest, to thy peril, thou aby it dear.” –Demetrius, Act III Scene 2

Juggler:  Deceiver, fraud.      Canker-Blossom:  Parasite that destroys the blossom (of love).  “O me! you juggler! you canker-blossom! /You thief of love!” –Hermia, Act III Scene 2

Suffer:  Allow, permit.      Flout:  Insult, abuse, mock.  “Why will you suffer her to flout me thus?” –Hermia, Act III Scene 2

Knot-Grass:  Species of creeping weed.  “You minimus, of hindering knot-grass made…” –Lysander, Act III Scene 2

Coil:  Turmoil, disturbance, fuss.  “You, mistress, all this coil is ‘long of you…”–Hermia, Act III Scene 2

Curst:  Bad-tempered, quarrelsome.  “I will not trust you, I, /Nor longer stay in your curst company.” –Helena, Act III Scene 2

Jangling:  Squabbling, arguing.  “And so far am I glad it so did sort /As this their jangling I esteem a sport.” –Puck, Act III Scene 2

Coy:  Caress, stroke, pet.  “Come, sit thee down upon this flowery bed, /While I thy amiable cheeks do coy…” –Titania, Act IV Scene 1

Wot:  Know.  ” I wot not by what power,— /But by some power it is, my love to Hermia, /Melted as the snow…” –Demetrius, Act IV Scene 1

Bully:  Fine fellow, good friend.  “O sweet bully Bottom!” –Flute, Act IV Scene 2

Dam:  Mother.  “Then know that I, one Snug the joiner, am /A lion-fell, nor else no lion’s dam…” –Snug, Act V Scene 1

Thrum:  Unwoven end of a warp-thread on a loom.  “O Fates, come, come, /Cut thread and thrum…” (i.e. cut everything) –Pyramus, Act V Scene 1

Quail:  Overpower, destroy, make an end.      Quell:  Kill, destroy, slay.  “Quail, crush, conclude, and quell!” –Pyramus, Act V Scene 1

An almanac from 1571; from the Folger Shakespeare Library
An almanac from 1571; from the Folger Shakespeare Library